Aerial Performance FAQ

How long does the show usually last?
A single set generally lasts about 5-15 minutes. Choreographed acts are generally 1-2 songs, and ambient performance is up to 4 10-minute ambient sets in per night. I can be flexible with the length of the show, accommodating the requirements your event.

How much space do you need for aerial acts?
12 feet is the minimum height required to perform on aerial hoop/lyra or on the freestanding tower. All other apparatus minimum heights range from 14 and up. If rigging to a ceiling or other structure, I require at least 6′ free space below and around the apparatus.

If bringing a free-standing aerial rig, it requires 25 x 25 ft of ground space and 18.5 feet in height. I also have a smaller, rectangular free-standing apparatus, which requires 8 x 8 feet of ground space and 12 feet overhead clearance.

A secure dressing area to store gear and personal belongings for the duration of the event is generally required, as well.

Can you perform in my venue?
I may need to speak to a building engineer familiar with the venue, or visit it for a preliminary assessment. If the venue has a drop ceiling, a site inspection is required.

For indoor shows, rigging from an exposed beam or rigging point installed in the ceiling of your venue is ideal. Exposed rafters or large structural beams that can bear loads of at least 2500 pounds. I’ll also require a ladder, lift or catwalk for access.

Can you perform outside?
Yes. I do use a freestanding aerial rig, which allows me to perform outside. If bringing the large free-standing aerial rig, it requires 25 x 25 ft of ground space and 18.5 feet in height. The smaller free-standing apparatus, requires 8 x 8 feet of ground space and 12 feet overhead clearance.

NOTE: I cannot perform outside if the weather is rainy, windy or there is a thunderstorm. The temperature must be over 60 degrees.

How dangerous is aerial performance?
Yes, aerial dancing is dangerous. I perform regularly in clubs, ballrooms, and theatres as well as at outdoor festivals and events. It is my job to train extensively (with a mat), to do safety checks on my equipment, to practice routines, to know my capabilities. I rehearse on site prior to an engagement to confirm the rigging is safe and secure.

While some engagements may call for use of a mat (which can be obscured to match event decoration), I do not use a net. Nets can be dangerous for falls from too short a distance and when equipment extends from the rigging point to the floor – as with straps, silk, rope – it could tangle or catch in a net.